Wednesday, March 30, 2016

TOK 1, March 30th - Extended Essay Research


This document has the instructions for your Formal Proposal and preliminary annotated Bibliography, which is due on Friday, April 1 (no foolin'). You will create this as a digital document, and then submit it both on paper and using the ManageBac System.

There is also a nifty template form now, so that your Formal Proposal will look extra formal.

Only after you have done some serious research into your topic will you be ready to develop a formal proposal.

Next, take a look at Purdue's OWL description of an annotated bibliography.  Notice that the annotated bibliography contains 2 parts.

  • Part 1: The bibliographic entry, listed in a conventional citation format (such as APA or MLA).
  • Part 2: The annotation (150-300 words), which gives a brief overview and assessment of the material from the source that you have found.  This annotation should contain at least:
    • brief objective summary of the work.
    • An evaluation of the source, its limitations and strengths.
    • reflection upon its usefulness in your research.  How does it fit? What does it add? What does it change in your thinking?
Purdue also has this example for you to look at.

Continue research.  You already have a broad idea of its direction, which should give you a good place to start your reading. You might start with Internet searches, but you should move quickly toward more reputable sources, including books, periodicals, and scholarly journals.

Here are some of the resources available through our LMC (if you need a password, you can find them here):
Remember that once you FIND a promising source, the next (and perhaps most important) step is

READ THE SOURCE.
  • Take notes as appropriate, including direct quotes that may be pertinent and summary elsewhere. 
  • Include page numbers in your notes.
  •  Create an appropriate Works Cited reference. Compose your Annotated Bibliography using your notes.

Friday, March 18, 2016

TOK 1: Day 70 (3/18): Wikipedia and the Extended Essay

Lets start by looking at this article from yesterday that discusses the Wikipedia entry for President Obama's supreme court nominee, Merrick Garland.


Consider:
  1. What knowledge concepts are involved in the situation?
  2. What knowledge claims are being made?
  3. What knowledge issues are at stake?
  4. How are the various actors in the situation navigating these issues? 
The remainder of the period should be spent on 

READING.

Monday, March 14, 2016

TOK 1, Day 68 & 69 (3/14 & 3/16): EE Workday


Begin by taking a look at this document. It gives the instructions for your Formal Proposal and preliminary annotated Bibliography,  which is your next major checkpoint in this process (Due by April 1). You will create this as a digital document, and then submit it both on paper and using the ManageBac System.

Do not begin creating this document now.  You must first begin

READING.

Only after you have done some serious research into your topic will you be ready to develop a formal proposal.

Next, take a look at Purdue's OWL description of an annotated bibliography.  Notice that the annotated bibliography contains 2 parts.

  • Part 1: The bibliographic entry, listed in a conventional citation format (such as APA or MLA).
  • Part 2: The annotation (150-300 words), which gives a brief overview and assessment of the material from the source that you have found.  This annotation should contain at least:
    • A brief objective summary of the work.
    • An evaluation of the source, its limitations and strengths.
    • A reflection upon its usefulness in your research.  How does it fit? What does it add? What does it change in your thinking?
Purdue also has this example for you to look at.

Now, I'd like for you to begin your research into your topic.  You already have a broad idea of its direction, which should give you a good place to start your reading. You might start with Internet searches, but you should move quickly toward more reputable sources, including books, periodicals, and scholarly journals.

Here are some of the resources available through our LMC (if you need a password, you can find them here):
Remember that once you FIND a promising source, the next (and perhaps most important) step is

READ THE SOURCE.
  • Take notes as appropriate, including direct quotes that may be pertinent and summary elsewhere. 
  • Include page numbers in your notes.
  •  Create an appropriate Works Cited reference. Compose your Annotated Bibliography using your notes.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

TOK 1: Practice with TOK Concepts, Questions, and Real Life Situations

Take the first 25 minutes of class to free-write on the following Prompt:

“Without application in the world, the value of knowledge is greatly diminished.” Consider this claim with respect to two areas of knowledge.

Rather than trying to write paragraphs, make a list of your ideas as they come to you.  Hit enter twice when your brain jumps to a new idea. Try to consider:

  • What words and ideas are key to understanding this prompt? What are tentative meanings/definitions for these words/ideas?
  • What TOK concepts seem to be at play?
  • What Knowledge Questions spring from the demands of the prompt?
  • What sorts of arguments are there that seem to  support the assertion? To refute it?
  • What ways of knowing are at play in thinking about this prompt?
  • What areas of knowledge seem pertinent?
  • How does the meaning of the prompt change within the context of different AOK/WOK?
  • What Real life situations come to mind when you think about this prompt?
Do not stop writing! If you get stuck, reread your list and add to ideas you have already thought of.

When we finish, take 5 minutes to reread all that you wrote.  Take note:

  1. Where did you finally "hit a stride" with the task?  How did you find entry into it?
  2. What one idea do you have that is already WELL PUT? This is an explanation that you think is clear and compelling and strongly worded.
  3. What one idea do you have that still feels half-formed? It seems important, but maybe you aren't sure how to say it yet?
  4. Note previously unnoticed links between your ideas.  
  5. Pick one question above that you found (relatively) easy to answer and one that you found difficult (or that you haven't yet addressed).

Thursday, March 3, 2016

TOK 1: Fractals


Today we will discuss the wonderful world of Fractals.

Creating Fractals
To begin, you will attempt to make some fractals of your own.  You will need:

  • A large piece of paper
  • A pencil
  • A ruler
  • Perhaps a protractor
Follow the rules to create your fractal.

What do you notice about the image that you are creating? What can we say about these diverse images?  What would a definition of fractals be?

Fractals in Nature
For Benoit Mandelbrot, who gave fractals their name and their theory, one of the most startling aspect of what seems at first to be a purely mathematical exercise was the frequency with which we encounter fractals and fractal-like structures in nature.

Take a few minutes to consider, and try to list ten examples of natural fractals.


Finally, consider this TEDTalk from Ron Eglash, "The Fractals at the heart of African design"




Now, let's apply the principles we learned from Fractals to a real-world problem:

How Long is the Coastline of Great Britain?
This question is also the title of one of Mandelbrot's original treatments of the topic.




More Fractal Resources:
"Scientists find evidence of mathematical structures in classic books"